center for global strategic monitoring

.
The New York Bomber Was Not a Lone Wolf

It was no surprise that in the first hours after the New York and New Jersey bombing attacks, the culprit was widely suggested to be a “lone wolf.” The term, used to describe an...

Read more

A Wealth of Friendship

Last Wednesday, the US and Israel signed a defense aid package totaling $38 billion. Negotiations were complicated, as this represents America’s largest-ever military aid package to Israel – or,...

Read more

Putin’s Illusions about Crimea

In the recent plenary session of the Eastern Economic Forum [on September 3 in Vladivostok], Russian President Vladimir Putin stated that the issue of Crimea’s ownership is historically closed....

Read more

The United States should be more cautious about its actions in Syria

There will be a new election in the United States soon. Maybe, after the presidential election there would be less national security threats resulting from presidential campaigns. Until now, much...

Read more

Israel’s New MOU: The Money and the Message

On September 14, the United States and Israel signed a ten-year Memorandum of Understanding under which Washington will provide $38 billion in military assistance over the fiscal years 2019-2028. The...

Read more

Recent Posts

How Ukraine Can Signal It’s Serious about Reform

Thirteen months since the last tranche, the IMF has finally allocated the third tranche of its program to Ukraine, bringing the total disbursement to $7.6 billion. Although it is less than the originally planned $1.7 billion and came with substantial delays, the receipt of the $1 billion tranche...

  • Trade Not Aid: Obama’s Africa Legacy

    The US-Africa Business Forum (USABF), which meets for the second time in New York on 21 September, provides a platform to deepen business and financial ties between the US and Africa, and is the culmination of efforts to diversify Washington’s focus away from humanitarian concerns and counterterrorism. Emphasizing...

  • Polio in Northern Nigeria

    The appearance of two cases of polio in northern Nigeria is an unmitigated tragedy. Anybody who has traveled in the region and seen firsthand the victims of paralysis caused by polio can but weep. And now there are two more. Victims often have no wheel-chairs and, as elsewhere, health care is rudimentary if it exists...

  • Egypt Foreign Minister Visits Lebanon: Starting a New Era?

    Egyptian Foreign Minister, Sameh Shoukry’s recent visit to Beirut has raised many questions. The Egyptian foreign minister announced that he held ideas and proposals to overcome the presidential vacuum in Lebanon, but he did not carry any solutions to the crisis. Sources seen Shoukry’s meetings said, he did not...

  • Zambia’s Political Unity Put to the Test By Need for Fiscal Discipline

    A closely contested and unpredictable election saw Zambia’s incumbent President Edgar Lungu of the Patriotic Front (PF) emerge victorious – but with just 50.35 per cent of the vote, protesters clashing with the police in the streets, and support mostly concentrated in the north and east of the country, much...

  • South Africa Left in Limbo By Landmark Election Results

    South Africa’s local election results have humiliated President Jacob Zuma—and for the first time since coming to power more than 20 years ago, the African National Congress (ANC) looks vulnerable. But rather than a new dawn for South Africa, the elections look like the start of a new era of coalition government,...

  • The New York Bomber Was Not a Lone Wolf

    It was no surprise that in the first hours after the New York and New Jersey bombing attacks, the culprit was widely suggested to be a “lone wolf.” The term, used to describe an individual inspired by others but acting on his or her own, has become the counterterrorism metaphor-of-choice in the age of the...

  • A Wealth of Friendship

    Last Wednesday, the US and Israel signed a defense aid package totaling $38 billion. Negotiations were complicated, as this represents America’s largest-ever military aid package to Israel – or, indeed, to any country. Starting in October 2018, $3.8 billion a year will be transferred to Israel over a period of 10...

  • Trade Not Aid: Obama’s Africa Legacy

    The US-Africa Business Forum (USABF), which meets for the second time in New York on 21 September, provides a platform to deepen business and financial ties between the US and Africa, and is the culmination of efforts to diversify Washington’s focus away from humanitarian concerns and counterterrorism. Emphasizing...

  • The United States should be more cautious about its actions in Syria

    There will be a new election in the United States soon. Maybe, after the presidential election there would be less national security threats resulting from presidential campaigns. Until now, much secret important information has been revealed due to carelessness of presidential candidates. Trump has repeatedly stated...

  • How Egyptians’ Conspiracy Theories About Clinton Explain Trump’s Appeal to Them

    Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are to meet with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi on Monday on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly. Whereas Mr. Trump’s meeting is consistent with his admiration for strongmen and therefore unsurprising, Mrs. Clinton’s meeting has surprised some in...

  • President Rahmon Takes Tajikistan Down a Dangerous Path

    Faced with a weak economy and a resurgent Taliban across the border in Afghanistan, Tajikistan’s president, Emomali Rahmon, has employed Russian President Vladimir Putin’s counterterrorism rhetoric to justify repressive political and religious policies that he is using to silence his opponents. Frequently...

  • New Dynamic in the North West

    Two years ago, when he became the president of Afghanistan, Ashraf Ghani accorded special emphasis on normalising relations with Pakistan. As he went out of the way to seek reconciliation with the Pakistan army, there was much anguish in Delhi’s strategic community. This week, as Ghani visits India to seek a...

  • 2016: The year for leadership that wasn’t for the China G-20

    2016 has been a tumultuous year for the world. After the successful conclusion of the climate change agreement in Paris in December of last year, and the endorsement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for 2030 by all members of the United Nations that September, there was a tectonic plate shift in the...

  • How Xi and Putin Humiliated Obama at the G-20

    On September 4-5, the G-20 held its annual summit in Hangzhou, China, President Xi Jinping’s home. G-20 summits tend to be meaningless, but this one appears to have been outright harmful. The signature event was when President Barack Obama’s Air Force One was not met with a staircase, and it went downhill from...

  • Japan Lays Out a Guide to Brexit

    The Japanese government paper on the implications of Brexit released on 2 September has been described in the UK media as an ‘unprecedented’ and ‘dire’ warning, a ‘stark’ threat, and dismissed as ‘doom-mongering’. In reality, it is a carefully-argued and very detailed analysis of the areas of...

  • How Ukraine Can Signal It’s Serious about Reform

    Thirteen months since the last tranche, the IMF has finally allocated the third tranche of its program to Ukraine, bringing the total disbursement to $7.6 billion. Although it is less than the originally planned $1.7 billion and came with substantial delays, the receipt of the $1 billion tranche was celebrated by the...

  • Memo to the West: Reject Russia’s Illegal Duma Elections

    On September 18, Russians went to the polls to elect 450 members of parliament. The big news is that Vladimir Putin’s United Russia performed surprisingly well, taking approximately 54 percent of the vote. But the underreported news is this: Russians elected four MPs from occupied Ukrainian Crimea, which is illegal...

  • Putin’s Illusions about Crimea

    In the recent plenary session of the Eastern Economic Forum [on September 3 in Vladivostok], Russian President Vladimir Putin stated that the issue of Crimea’s ownership is historically closed. Despite the adamant tone, such statements do not show Russia’s confidence but instead reveal the Kremlin’s...

  • Britain’s UN Peacekeeping Role Must Go Beyond Troop Numbers

    The UK has pledged to send a further 100 troops to South Sudan as part of the UN’s peacekeeping mission there, increasing its total contribution to 400. This will likely have little benefit for the South Sudanese caught up in the conflict but may have significant implications for the UK military.  Contributing...

  • Brexit and the Rise of Rejectionism

    Here are two truths; the question is, how can they be reconciled? Truth number one: by far the biggest issue in the minds of the men and women who voted for Britain to leave the EU in the June 23 referendum was immigration. They felt it was out of control: that immigrants were undercutting British […]

  • The Agreement between Israel and the Palestinian Authority on Electricity: Guiding Rationales for a Working Model

    In September 2016, an agreement was signed between the Israeli Ministry of Finance, the Coordinator of Government Activities in the Territories (COGAT), and the Palestinian Authority (via the Minister of Civil Affairs), to regulate Palestinian debt payment to the Israel Electric Corporation. Terms of the agreement...

  • A Wealth of Friendship

    Last Wednesday, the US and Israel signed a defense aid package totaling $38 billion. Negotiations were complicated, as this represents America’s largest-ever military aid package to Israel – or, indeed, to any country. Starting in October 2018, $3.8 billion a year will be transferred to Israel over a period of 10...

  • The United States should be more cautious about its actions in Syria

    There will be a new election in the United States soon. Maybe, after the presidential election there would be less national security threats resulting from presidential campaigns. Until now, much secret important information has been revealed due to carelessness of presidential candidates. Trump has repeatedly stated...

  • Jordan Goes to the Polls: A Comeback for the Muslim Brotherhood?

    Recent polls indicate that turnout for Jordan’s September 20 parliamentary elections will be low, likely because the people have long viewed that institution as ineffective and irrelevant. Nevertheless, the contest will be a significant test of strength for Jordan’s Islamists. The Islamic Action Front...

  • The U.S. Strike in Deir al-Zour: Implications on the Ground

    On September 17, planes from the U.S.-led coalition in Syria attacked a target inside the city of Deir al-Zour, triggering an outcry from Bashar al-Assad’s regime and Russia while raising questions about the strike’s goals and consequences. Damascus and Moscow have claimed that the location was a fixed...

  • Memo to the West: Reject Russia’s Illegal Duma Elections

    On September 18, Russians went to the polls to elect 450 members of parliament. The big news is that Vladimir Putin’s United Russia performed surprisingly well, taking approximately 54 percent of the vote. But the underreported news is this: Russians elected four MPs from occupied Ukrainian Crimea, which is illegal...

  • Putin’s Illusions about Crimea

    In the recent plenary session of the Eastern Economic Forum [on September 3 in Vladivostok], Russian President Vladimir Putin stated that the issue of Crimea’s ownership is historically closed. Despite the adamant tone, such statements do not show Russia’s confidence but instead reveal the Kremlin’s...

  • A Russian-US Agreement on a Ceasefire in Syria

    The agreement between Russia and the United States on a Syrian ceasefire, coming into effect on September 12, 2016, is a compromise between two rival powers, each with its own political agenda. It is hardly surprising that the effort to reach the agreement lasted several months and stretched over a series of meetings,...

  • An Important Reform Milestone: An Independent Energy Regulator in Ukraine

    It is hard to find anything that unites the Ukrainian parliament as efficiently as the body’s regular and purposeful failure to adopt the bill on the National Commission for State Regulation of Energy and Public Utilities. Neither the demands of the expert community, nor the bill’s connection with Ukraine’s...

  • What to Know About Russia’s Parliamentary Elections

    On 18 September, Russians will go to the polls to elect representatives to State Duma, the lower house of parliament. Candidates from 14 parties will compete for the 450 seats in the first national parliamentary elections since December 2011. They come at a potentially challenging time for the Russian leadership, not...