center for global strategic monitoring

.
Trump Administration Censorship: Banning Seven Words | Global Research

Featured image: Rep. Ted Lieu (Source: Mashable) VISIT MY NEW WEB SITE:  stephenlendman.org  (Home – Stephen Lendman).  Contact at [email protected]. His administration’s holiday season...

Read more

War Propaganda: “Fake News” and the Pentagon’s Office of Strategic Influence (OSI) | Global Research

Author’s note The following text on Rumsfeld’s “Office of Strategic Influence” (OSI) was first published by Global Research in January 2003 two months before the onslaught of the war on...

Read more

America’s “Jacob’s Ladder”. What They Want is a “Total Military Industrial Empire” | Global Research

In Adrian Lyne‘s 1990 drama, Jacob’s Ladder (see book cover right below), Tim Robbins plays a haunted Vietnam War vet mourning his dead son, while suffering from severe disassociation. Throughout...

Read more

Jerusalem – The Straw that Breaks the Empire’s Back? | Global Research

When President Trump on 6 December 2017 declared unilaterally Jerusalem as the capital of Israel to where the US Embassy shall relocate, he violated UN Resolutions, international law, common sense...

Read more

Creating the 21st Century Internet | Global Research

Ajit Pai, the former Verizon lawyer who is chair of the FCC, went too far last Thursday in undermining the Internet when he led the dismantling of net neutrality rules. As a result, he has fueled the...

Read more

Recent Posts

  • Rising Sino-Japanese competition in Africa

    On August 27 and 28, the Sixth Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD VI) was held in Nairobi, Kenya—the first time the TICAD has been hosted in Africa since its inception in 1993. During the forum, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged $30 billion in public and private support for...

  • Sisi’s Gamble: How Egypt’s Turn Toward Iran Changes Power in the Region

    In recent months, there has been a major shift in Egypt’s foreign policy. Despite it almost going unnoticed, this unexpected policy change is a source of concern for many actors in the Middle East, particularly the Arab Gulf states that have supported Abdel Fattah al-Sisi’s regime since the military coup that took...

  • Egypt’s Pragmatic Salafis: The Politics of Hizb al-Nour

    The Salafi movement in Egypt illustrates that the dynamics of sectarianism are fluid and sometimes contradictory. Over the last five years, the Salafi party, Hizb al-Nour, has taken a pragmatic, flexible approach to politics, but maintained its intransigent religious stances. While the party has made several political...

  • Can Tunisia’s new prime minister overcome the trust deficit?

    Tunisia’s Prime Minister-designate, Youssef Chahed, is expected to announce his cabinet this week, well ahead of the September 3 deadline. Chahed, who was appointed by President Beji Caid Essebsi on August 2 after former prime minister Habib Essid failed to win a no confidence vote, has a tremendous burden on his...

  • Nigeria’s War Against Indiscipline

    In 2016, President Muhammadu Buhari said “The long-cherished and time honored, time-tested virtues of honesty, integrity, hard work, punctuality, good neighborliness, abhorrence of corruption and patriotism, have given way in the main to dishonesty, indolence, unbridled corruption and widespread impunity.” He...

  • America’s Immigration Quagmire

    America’s immigration problem raises a huge set of thorny issues. At a theoretical level, it is difficult to articulate, let alone implement, the ideal immigration policy. While there are compelling arguments in favor of the basic norm of free trade, an open immigration policy could lead to massive political...

  • Trump: An opportunity for federalism

    There’s a wonderful exchange in A Man for All Seasons in which Thomas More debates young idealist William Roper about the need for laws and giving the accused the benefit of the doubt. For space considerations, let’s jump to the end: Roper: So now you’d give the Devil benefit of law! More: Yes. What would...

  • Trump Tax Plan Could Negatively Impact Giving

    Treasury Secretary nominee Steve Mnuchin recently promised that “there will be no absolute tax cut for the upper class” under President-elect Trump’s tax plan. While the plan would cut the top personal income tax rate from 39.6% to 33% and the capital gains and dividends tax rate from 23.8% to 20%, Mnuchin...

  • Muddying the issues: Five questionable claims on U.S. foreign policy

    Politics has a way of oversimplifying complex policy debates, and the 2016 presidential campaign has been no exception. Foreign policy presents particular challenges, since many American voters are less well-versed on topics like the Iran nuclear deal, global institutions, or Syria and ISIS. As a result, extreme...

  • Experts weigh in: What this election means for U.S. foreign policy and next steps

    The U.S. election season was watched with great interest around the world, and with good reason—with the office of the presidency comes great power in the domain of international affairs. We asked Brookings foreign policy experts what this election means for U.S. foreign policy (both in general and for a particular...

  • Sisi’s Gamble: How Egypt’s Turn Toward Iran Changes Power in the Region

    In recent months, there has been a major shift in Egypt’s foreign policy. Despite it almost going unnoticed, this unexpected policy change is a source of concern for many actors in the Middle East, particularly the Arab Gulf states that have supported Abdel Fattah al-Sisi’s regime since the military coup that took...

  • Can Lebanon’s Old Guard forge new social contract?

    Michel Aoun, the leader of the Free Patriotic Movement and Lebanon’s new president, has done what many might have considered impossible until the moment it happened — gaining the acquiescence of Hezbollah to form a new Lebanese government with Saad Hariri as prime minister. As this column noted last week,...

  • Turkish-American Relations in the Post-Election Period

    As ever, we are nearing the completion of yet another long and controversial presidential race in the U.S., and all the global players are bracing themselves to see and adapt to the final outcome next week. While Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump use their last bullets over multifaceted accusations, alleged scandals...

  • Inside the making of India’s foreign policy

    A unique experience in a classroom last year caused me to write a new book, titled “Choices: Inside the Making of India’s Foreign Policy.” I was leading a study group on Indian foreign policy at Harvard, where one session was devoted to India-Pakistan relations. We naturally discussed cross-border terrorism and...

  • A Paralyzing Rivalry

    As Hamas prepares to elect a new leadership, its outward show of unity masks deep internal divisions that will likely perpetuate its regional isolation. The upcoming internal Hamas elections, which will be conducted over a number of months in a secretive, phased process, will take place in a radically altered regional...

  • Isolated Iran Finds Bosom Buddies In West

    Aleppo is faced with a massive humanitarian tragedy, heavy massacres and the threat of genocide. …

  • How Macedonia Is Leading on the Refugee Crisis

    In little more than a year, millions of desperate refugees have fled from the wars in Syria and Iraq. Many hundreds of thousands have reached European shores, with their distressing plight broadcast around the world. The sluggish reaction from some of the world’s biggest economies so far has forced the smaller ones...

  • The far Right is far from finished in Austria

    Across European capitals, there was a sigh of relief when Norbert Hofer conceded his defeat to Alexander Van der Bellen in Austria’s presidential election on Sunday. No wonder. This was not an ordinary election. If he had been successful – as some polls suggested and betting markets predicted – Mr Hofer would...

  • What’s Next for France after Fillon’s Primary Victory

    The tsunami of populism, nationalism, and antiestablishment sentiment, exemplified by the Brexit referendum and U.S. presidential election, may break again in France’s two-round presidential election in April–May 2017. On December 1, Socialist president François Hollande (with polls indicating his support was in...

  • Ukraine’s Most Overlooked Reform Could Bring in Billions

    Of the key battles fought in post-Maidan Ukraine, the one over land reform attracts little attention. That’s a shame, too. Parliament’s unwillingness to allow the sale of private farmland “is the biggest source of immediately available economic growth that the government has failed to utilize,” Swedish...

  • In Venezuela, real dialogue remains unlikely. What can be done to change this?

    Venezuelan politics are becoming progressively more chaotic: This month, a judicial order cancelled an opposition-led drive to hold a presidential recall referendum; scheduled gubernatorial elections were postponed; President Nicolás Maduro went on a frantic, globe-spanning diplomatic trip seeking support for his...

  • After the Obama-Erdogan Meeting at the G20

    The meeting between President Barack Obama and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on September 4 at the G20 provided the two leaders with their first face-to-face opportunity to discuss the aggravated tensions in the U.S.-Turkish relationship since the July 15 coup attempt. Obama’s comments at their joint...

  • Saudi-Egyptian Tensions: Rifts Within the “Camp of Stability” Serve Iran’s Interests

    On July 31, 2015, the dominant player in Saudi Arabia today, Defense Minister (and the King’s son) Muhammad Bin Salman, met Egyptian president Abd al-Fattah Sisi and signed the Cairo Declaration, which pledged closer ties. On April 9, 2016, the Egyptian government declared – against strong opposition at home...

  • How Macedonia Is Leading on the Refugee Crisis

    In little more than a year, millions of desperate refugees have fled from the wars in Syria and Iraq. Many hundreds of thousands have reached European shores, with their distressing plight broadcast around the world. The sluggish reaction from some of the world’s biggest economies so far has forced the smaller ones...

  • Jordan-Israel Relations: Normalization in the Shadow of Political Deadlock

    On September 26, 2016, Noble Energy announced that it signed a contract with the Jordan Electric Power Company. Noble Energy is the American partner in the consortium that holds the rights to produce natural gas in the Leviathan field, which is within Israel’s exclusive economic zone. The supply of 3 billion...

  • Has Putin Finally Stepped on His Own Rake in Syria?

    In October 2016 the Russian government made a significant announcement about its Syria policy that Western sources overlooked. Moscow announced that it supported the restoration of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s power throughout the country, something it had not stressed previously. This statement and its...

  • Why Russia isn’t rushing to lift sanctions on Turkey

    For a long time, Russian-Turkish relations were based on a certain formula: “The economy is the economy. Politics is politics. And they shouldn’t be mixed.” This formula worked successfully until Nov. 24, 2015, when Turkey shot down a Russian jet. Relations between the two countries, which used to be...

  • America and Russia: Towards a New Partnership?

    In the run-up to the US presidential election, the mainstream media, the democratic campaign, and even some Republicans repeatedly warned of the supposed endangerment of the US national interest by the apparent affinity between Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin. But how real is this threat? And wouldn’t...

  • Holodomor Remembrance Day: Why the Past Matters for the Future

    As Americans sit down to their Thanksgiving meals on the last Thursday in November, Ukrainians will be commemorating the memory of millions who were murdered in 1932-33. The last Saturday in November is Holodomor Remembrance Day in Ukraine, a time to mark the anniversary of Joseph Stalin’s engineered starvation of...

  • How Russia views Turkey’s role in Syria

    As experts on Russia and Turkey are wondering just how receptive US President-elect Donald Trump will be to their agendas in the Middle East, Moscow and Ankara have been involved in a series of talks over Syria. Indeed, Turkish officials have become frequent guests in Moscow. The most recent visit, on Nov. 1, brought...